Join DAV 9

JOINING THE DAV

The DAV has only life memberships and they are based on your age. There are two options:

Make an initial payment of $40 and the National DAV will bill you quarterly over three years.

Pay your whole life membership at once and Chapter 9 will pay $20 of your total bill.

AGE                        LIFE AMOUNT
40 or younger……………………………………$250.00
41 to 60…………………………………………….$230.00
61 to 70…………………………………………….$160.00
71 to 79…………………………………………….$140.00
Over 80……………………………………………..Free

Make your checks out to DAV minus $20.00 if you elect to pay the whole amount at one time. Do not send to National DAV,  especially if you want the $20 discount. Contact the Chapter adjutant:

Contact:    Robert B. Hunt, QMC, USN, (Ret.)
              Chapter Adjutant
                  2536 W. Falling Star Loop
        Post Falls, Idaho 83854-9808
        208 773-1074
        cinc@frontier.com

We can fill out the membership application in person or over the telephone. You can come to a meeting with the check or mail it to the adjutant.

The Chapter has a policy of purchasing your uniform DAV Cap after you have attended three consecutive meetings, which is a $45 value.

Joining brings you in contact with others in similar circumstances to yours and allows exchange of information and ideas. Joining makes the DAV more effective in lobbying for your and your families benefits. First, you join for yourself and will soon learn that we do it for the greater good.

Membership Application PDF

Click on button to open form, print form, fill in your information.

Send printed form or bring it to a meeting so you can meet you comrades in person.

 

At the end of World War I, American doughboys, veterans of the fighting in the trenches of France were overflowing the public health hospitals and left to survive on the street. They were shell-shocked, wounded, sick, and suffering from gas warfare. Their lungs were seared from Mustard gas and every breath was a major accomplishment. Many were blind and more were missing limbs.

A few far-sighted veterans formed the Disabled American Veterans in the early 1920’s. These men pledged to join together and work to help their disabled brothers, their families, widows and orphans to improve their lot in life.

Almost a hundred years later, Fort Sherman Chapter 9, chartered in 1938 continues that same mission. The benefits that we have are a result of those men who came before us. Each of us has an obligation to step up and work to carry on that tradition for the good of ourselves and those who come behind us. When you join us there are many benefits to you, the Chapter, veterans and their families.  First, there is the service comradeship to welcome you. Your activity in the Chapter will directly and indirectly affect veterans and their families.

All of us in the DAV have been wounded, gasses or injured in time of war. You will be amazed at the variety of difficulties our membership overcomes. We compensate and allow for the injuries we all have, but we then overcome them and proceed on to help others. This Chapter is the go-to group when help is needed. We do and have done everything from chopping wood, building goat pens, bury and cremating veterans, scholarships, repairing roofs, providing propane, fixing cars, feeding and transporting veterans. If there is a need we will find a way to get it done. We have a great reputation and many people and businesses will help us if we explain what we need. Our latest help was to replace a furnace system for an 80 veteran with cancer and a wife with a hip replacement. We partnered with Border Heating and they worked with Lennox and within a month they not only had a heating system, but an air conditioner too.

As you cash your Department of Veterans Affairs disability payment, take a moment and think about that money. Veterans worked to get Congress to enact the laws that now help you. Veterans worked to keep it relevant. Veterans work to ensure that the VA and veterans benefits do not go away in times of budget cutting. In trench warfare, one squad can cover so many yards of frontline and a company so much coverage. A battalion and regiments are given more coverage. Each one of those units has one fundamental similarity. The most common element is the single soldier. Alone, the single soldier will be overrun. A squad will be overrun. A company not so much and a regiment is so much stronger.

A single disabled veteran has not much ability to influence events, but thousands and hundreds of thousands of disabled veteran can and do influence our nation’s leaders and the general public. We don’t want soldiers left in the street and they won’t if we join together……